Three Tell-Tale Signs You Are Ready For College Sports

ByBryan Armetta

Published on Tue Feb 09 2021

|

3 min read

Three Tell-Tale Signs You Are Ready For College Sports

Plenty of high school athletes think they have what it takes to play sports in college. However, few truly stand out from the rest.

For the select number of talented young men and women who do dominate their selected sports, it can become hard to determine what one's skill is compared to other aspiring athletes across the nation. To do so, it is important to have tangible evidence that can prove you are able to make the jump to college athletics.

Here are three signs that can prove you have what it takes to take part in college competition.


Winning Tournaments And Events

Gaining the attention of college coaches and scouts first means building up one's reputation. There is no better way to do this than by proving your worth in tournaments and other events.

As opposed to simply doing well on school or even AAU teams, tournaments are a chance to go up against some of the best in your state and/or region. In many ways, this is a chance for recruiters to see who truly has what it takes. Playing in more tournaments also increases an athlete's exposure and proves they are willing to go up against tough opposition.

To excel in these events shows that a potential student athlete has both the drive to be better and proof that they have stood out from the cream of the crop. While winning best in state is a lofty goal, simply getting recognized for a solid performance at a number of different events can prove that you have what it takes.

Winning at the local level can also propel high schoolers to even greater heights, including national tournaments and even national teams, often sponsored by reputable athletic brands and companies. Those who manage to reach this level have a great chance of making the cut at high-end programs across the country.


Training To Beat The Best

There is no way to more obviously outdo your peers than hitting the weight room and pushing yourself.

If you're lasting longer and lifting more than your teammates, theres a good chance somebody will notice. For weight lifters, college programs are always looking for high-motor athletes, and bench-press glory is an easy way to stand out. In addition, the more advanced and technically strong a high school player is in the weight room, the easier it will be for school strength and conditioning staffs to help them achieve even higher goals.

Weight lifting is obviously not the only workout regimen for high school students. Running faster, showcasing increased agility, and exemplifying stamina via drills are just a few of the ways where athletes can train to be the best at any given sport. Finding a way to increase reps to the point where you outrun or outlast everyone else is key to gaining an athletic scholarship.


College Attention

The goal for high school athletes that want to continue their career is always to meet and form relationships with coaches and scouts, who hold the keys to their potential recruitment.

However, this can sometimes be deceiving. Scouts who attend your high school tournaments, with players from various schools in attendance, are not necessarily there for you. As stated before, winning these tournaments can make a big difference in how you are viewed by collegiate coaching staffs. Still, these events are mainly a way to gauge regional talent, and usually aren't devoted to just one player.

If members from a college team happen to visit a game/match you are participating in at school, then there may be reason to believe they are there to see you up close. Unlike a tournament, where good players can often get lost in the shuffle given the amount of talent on hand, local sporting events are a good way for staffs to scout your ability on a more personal level.

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