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Winter Olympics: What Is Luge?

ByScotty Jenkins

Published on Sat Jan 15 2022

|

3 min read

Winter Olympics: What Is Luge?

Now that USA Luge has made it possible for any athlete to gain attention from their team coaches in the USA Luge Talent Search, it might be a good idea to spread some more info about this Winter Olympic sport.

A luge is a sporting event where one to two competitors sled on their backs and race to the finish line with the fastest time possible. It requires the use of the shoulders, abdominal, and thigh muscles to control the pace and direction of the sled.

In the 16th century, Luge was a traditional sport for the people in Switzerland. The sport became an influence to the world that added to the Winter Olympics games in 1964. Since then, competitors in the men's and women's events sledding in a supine position as they speed to the finish line. If you dream of trying it out or learning more about it, read along as you get the understanding of Luge.


Is Luge a difficult sport?

Depending on the number of years of training and experience, it varies among new and current competitors. To have a higher chance to win, you'll need to be physically fit before the event. Exercise routines on the upper body and thighs can increase muscle tone and strength to control the speed and direction of the sled. Examples of intense upper body and thighs workouts are bench press, push-ups, weighted dips, squats, lunge, and leg raises.

What is the most challenging parts of Luge?

Luge is one of the easy sport to compete in the Winter Olympics Games; however, it takes more than lying down on your back to have a higher chance of winning.

Control the Speed of the Sled

The shed can increase accelerate at 90 or more miles per hour. As your speed down in the steep ice, the sled's stability decrease. A lack of stability in the sled can result in being out of the race's tracks and suffering minor to several injuries on the body. That's why it's crucial to be physically fit on your body to ensure you have a tight grip on the sled and control the pace and directions.

Face the Fear on the Ice

Luge is indeed about sledding to the finish line with the fastest time; however, it's also about facing your fear on the ice. New competitors who start the sport for the first time will experience little to no fear, while current competitors have to face their fear in the past. Most professional luge athletes start training at five to twelve years old to learn the techniques. The younger you begin training, the easiest you can compete without feeling anxious, fear, or panic.

What are the qualifications needed for Luge?

Are you having thoughts on joining the USA Luge Team? If you say yes, here are three qualifications you must meet before proceeding with the event:

  • You have become a member of the United States Luge Association.
  • Complete all USA Luge Sliding Programs you're qualified for the training.
  • Men athletes must weigh at least 198 pounds
  • Women athletes must weigh at least 165 pounds
  • Additional weights are added to the suits to meet the minimum weight for males and females.



Do you have what it take to be a Professional Luge Athlete?


After reading about Luge, do you consider yourself a pro to this sport? If you say yes, don't wait, and go to https://www.teamusa.org/usa-luge/become-a-member and complete the necessary form to begin your journey. Remember these factors while you start your training, physical fitness, control the speed and direction of the sled, and encourage. As long you possess these three factors, you'll do it in a long-time career and never look back.

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